Tag: london

History on the Screen 3.1: Victoria and The Crown Pt. 2

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Below you’ll find the doppelganger chart I mentioned the day before yesterday, that shows the tele-cinematic counterparts of the historical people of the British royal family appearing in the first two seasons of both shows, Victoria (PBS & WGBH Materpiece) and The Crown (Netflix).

From George to shining George.

King_George_III_of_England_by_Johann_ZoffanyEr, from old King George III–who lost the American colonies and later went crazy–down to his 7th-great-grandson, the wee Prince sd-aspect-1461114471-prince-george-800George, who, somewhat coincidentally, if and when he becomes king anywhere from like the year 2033 to the 2070s (!!!) will be King George VII.

Incidentally, in the course of scouring the web for pictures of both the real Victoria and Elizabeth II when they were young, I found two of particular interest, one of each.E n M 1

Here’s the one of Elizabeth II. It’s awesome. Because in it she looks like she’s being just absolutely real, her real self (whoever that is) and though that isn’t *necessarily* any of our business, in the same spirit that The Crown brilliantly humanizes her, so too does this picture. All the more interesting and charming because she’s with her sister, who is known (from real life for those who’ve been alive longer, u-hem) and the show to have been the more animated, lively, apt to be found tossing one back and guffawing. And yet here, ’tis Her Majesty doing just that. Plus, it’s a hoot, that checked-out expression on Tony’s face.

V 1The particular one I found of Victoria is just a bit below. But why it caught my attention so sharply warrants a short explanation and some other pix. Ok, so I V 3found some genuinely charming pictures of young and younger Victoria from the era that the show so far has covered. Like these, to the right and the left.

And, ok, we all sort of know that tele-cinematic depictions of people–no matter who–are going to involve casting actors who generally speaking have physical looks that conform more to the telegenic norms. Ya with me? In other words, literally on the face of it, although they’ve done clever and appropriate things to Jenna Coleman’s hair and face to give the impression of Victoria, Jenna is just cute as a button, conventionally speaking, doesn’t have that proud and tremendous nose Victoria had, or the lovely and ample rounded cheeks.

Victoria_sketch_1835But then this picture caught my eye. (Wasn’t hiding anywhere esoteric, either; it’s on the Wikipedia page.) This picture is a self-portrait that Victoria drew about the time she took the throne. This is how the young Victoria saw herself. I think it looks so much like Jenna Coleman that I’m fairly if not fully convinced that the geniuses making the show intentionally cast an actress who resembled this picture, because that’s the point of the show: we’re seeing the world as she saw it, so by God why should we see the woman any way but how she saw herself?

Genius move.

And I think my somewhat wacky idea, here, gains Her_Majesty's_Gracious_Smile_by_Charles_Knightcredence with this other picture, taken of the old Victoria. But it’s different in that–look at that smile! Her face is transformed! She doesn’t even, to me anyway, resemble the stolid, stoic Victoria that we’re all quite used to seeing. This smiling woman looks so sweet, so loving, so warm and present and…just the way Jenna portrays her, as she’s written and directed in the show.

So, to keeping the public at bay if ya need to.

And to warmth. At least on that level, the monarch gets to have their cake and share it with whom they please.

Here’s the tree w/ the actors next to their historical characters.

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Senior Descendants of Edward III Pt. 2

Following up on the 1st post on Edward III’s seemingly largely unknown descendants through his oldest child who *has* a line of descent, his daughter Isabella.

Below is the chart showing the beginning of her line. Next post will have info and explanations of the why’s and wherefor’s.

(And as ever, remember to click the image so you get the big version in another tab.)

Edward III de Coucy de Bar Family Tree, Isabella of England, Engeurrard VII de coucy, Marie de Coucy, Robert of Bar, Jeanne of Bar, senior Plantagenets,

History on the Screen 2: Thanks Be to GOT!

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Thank heavens for the success of Game of Thrones!

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Its huge wave of popularity emboldended moneymen, er, TV producers to greenlight similar shows set grimly & grimily in that distant past of dark armor, shields & swords that gives Game of Thrones its look and feel.

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Surging forth first (or at least most notably) on this cashflow has been the epic & popular “Vikings”, and now “The Last Kingdom”, a BBC adaptation from a book in a series by British historical novelist and former news correspondent Bernard Cornwell that chronicles goings-on in England in the centuries before the year 1000.

And it’s awesome.

Statue_d'Alfred_le_Grand_à_WinchesterIt’s set during the reign of King Alfred the Great of England, so in the late decades of the 800s AD/Common Era (CE). Like stories &960 copy cinematic adaptations before such as Little Big Man, it inserts a fictional character into totally historically accurate situations to tell the past context in human detail.

For now, and for any fan of the show, here’s a chart I’ve done showing Alfred’s descendants for a few generations. Click on it and in the new tab click it again so you can check it out in detail if you like. More on this show later.

alfred the great family tree, wessex, anglo-saxons, mercia, northumbria, essex, kent, last kingdom, edward the confessor family tree, edmund ironside, winchester, louis iv of france, aethelred, eadwig, eadred, aethelstan, english, eadgar, early english kings family tree, by kylen Campbell, famtracking

More on the show next time.

 

Tree of the War of the Roses

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This post serves up a long overdue updated version of a tree capturing the gist of the War of the Roses, showing the kings and queens of England who sprang from the many uncrowned sons of King Edward III (seen above with his wife and 2nd cousin Philippa of Hainault). It’s as tidy as can be, leaves out very little, actually, and conveys a lot without being totally overwhelming.

Firstly, though, here’s a chart as a frame of reference showing Edward & Philippa and their sons, not one of whom was ever King of England. (Always click on it, and then once you go to the tab it opens in, click it again so it assumes its full and I hope enjoyable capacity.)

war of the roses, york, lancaster, plantagenet family tree, plantagenets, edward iii, john of gaunt, this england, james i, elizabeth i, henry viii, henry vii, margaret beaufort, dan jones, cecily neville, richard iii, richard ii, somerset, beaufort, game of thrones

The king immediately following Edward’s death in 1377 was the son of Edward, the oldest son and was named Richard II. The next king was picked by Richard to be one of the grandkids of the 2nd oldest son Lionel, but instead the oldest son of the 3rd son, John, Duke of Lancaster, decided to be king and simply took the crown, telling his younger (half) brother that neither he nor any of his descendants ever got to be king, and then passed it on down to his son and then he to his son. But then it went to a great-grandson of the 4th son, Edmund, Duke of York named Edward (again, this time the 4th, or: IV), then very briefly to his teenage son before going to his (Edward IV’s) younger brother who happened to nicely bookend this hot-potato-like game of the throne that had commenced with Edward III’s death by being named Richard also, and thus the 3rd, or: III.

But then he went and got killed by someone who was a great-great-grandson of the 3rd son (John of Lancaster) who happened to be married to a lady who was both a 4x-great-granddaughter of the 2nd oldest son (Lionel, Duke of Clarence), a 2x-great-granddaugher of the 3rd son (John, Lancaster again) as well as a 2x-great-grandaughter of the 3rd son Edmund (of York). This guy was named Henry and when he took that crown became the 7th one, or Henry VII. The son of his and wife Elizabeth was of course, good ole Henry VIII, he was, and all three of this Henry’s kids would rule England when their time came, but since none of them had any kiddies, the crown passed, as is well known, to a man who was the great-grandson of Henry VIII’s big sister Margaret, one James, who was already by right of birth James VI, King of Scots, and on the death of his grandma’s and grandpa’s 1st cousin Elizabeth I in 1609, became King James I of England.

Click on this chart below, download it so you can zoom way in.

There will be a follow-up post that offers something in the way of an explanation of chart-making choices and highlighting some of the use-values of the chart.

If you repost, borrow, or in any way use it, please attribute. Thanks. Enjoy!

war of the roses, wars of the roses, plantagenet roll, blood royal, york, lancaster, plantagenet family tree, plantagenets, edward iii, john of gaunt, this england, james i, elizabeth i, henry viii, henry vii, margaret beaufort, dan jones, cecily neville, richard iii, richard ii, somerset, beaufort, game of thrones

 

My hope is that this chart–this war of the roses family tree–will be shared, linked to, and used widely as a reference.